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in the morning, and at the end of the day, they're dead. >> with them, street to stree, as they fight assad's army. >> we are returning now, after the attack. it just shows you how brave they are, and at the same time, how disorganized they are. >> guardicorrespondent for frontlinghaith abdul-ahad, takes you inside the battle for syria. and later tonight, the regime responds. >> the regime now is bombarding civilian neighborhoods with artillery, with tank fire, and with fighter bombers. >> how is president bashar al-assad holding on to power? >> the iranians are gaining influence in syria now by the day. >> and what will happen if asd falls? >> there is definitely increasing worry in the united states administration about in whose hands these weapons are falling. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant
be to the opposition, that president assad does enjoy support from some courtney in -- ordinary syrians. many centers are on touched by violence. our correspondent has been to one such city. >> another day dawns on the mediterranean. the only fighting on this part of the syrian coast is between friends on that jet skis. welcome. it is long a place of holiday for syrians. now they are coming here in search of refuge. on the streets here, there is an eased you do not find many places anymore. i arranged to meet a group of students at a popular cafe. the come from syria felt many ethnic and religious groups -- they come from syria from many ethnic and religious groups. but there is no attention around this table. these friends call themselves one big family. it is hard to believe war is raging about an hour's drive away. >> it is a fantastic place. i like my town. >> what do you think about them saying it is too dangerous to come to syria? >> no, no. you can stay in this place. no, nothing. >> nothing happens. there is no problem here. may be like -- they say there is a problem in damascus, for example.
>> now i booktv david lesch talks about the rise of bashar al-assad and syria that he would implement reforms in this country and the syrian rulers repression and violence in recent years. this is just under one hour. >> we have a program with david lesch. david is a professor of middle eastern history in san antonio texas and david has been going to syria for at least 23 years. >> since 1989, 23 years. >> has some experience in that country but most interesting in them reason i most excited to have him talk to us tonight, unlike a lot of people have lots who have lots of opinions about syria david cutugno bashar al-assad which is a pretty unique expected for an academic in particular and david wrote a book in 2005 which held up great hope for the future of syria under bush are. if you recall there is some sense that bashar would a reformer of syria after his father died and we have now discovered that is not the case and he is now written another book called the fall of the house of assad. we are going to talk a bit about that tonight and my first question is going to be, w
much trouble that yesterday, before yesterday and the whole town of bishara al-assad, there have been demonstrations, should and we understand, one of the cousins has been killed here this is to say nothing. so the family is in very serious trouble. compare this with a year ago and i think that would give us a glimpse into how long the and of the two is going to be. >> i wanted to reinforce the concept of the demonstrations two weeks ago. we recorded more than 540 peaceful demonstrations around the country, that these people continue to go out is a testament to their desire to expedite the fall of the regime. but you also see is one pillar support of the regime has been shaking and they've been shaking faster and faster and will collapse. you will see that in areas like media where we have a significant number of media personalities who are now speaking out. you see that in the business sector. i don't off everybody knows this, but there is a price tag on the heads. a bounty of $25 million for bashar al-assad's head. so all these pillars are shaking faster and faster. i don't think it
>> now on booktv, david lesch talks the rest of the shower al-assad in syria, the fates many in the west had you implement reforms in this country was silly and towards repression and violence in recent years. this is just under an hour. >> tonight, we have a program with david lesch. david is professor of middle eastern studies, middle eastern history at the university in san antonio, texas. david has been going to syria for 23 years. >> is going to be -- with 1989? 23 years. >> plenty of experience in that country. the most interesting and the reason i'm most excited to talk to us tonight, unlike a lot of people who talk about opinions, david actually got to know the shower al-assad, which is a unique perspective for an academic figure. david wrote a book in 2005, which held up great hopes for the future of syria under bashar, that he would be a reformer in syria after his father died was now discovered that it's not the case and is now written another book called the fall of the house of support. are going to talk about that tonight. my first question is going to be, when
done is organize the international community. saying assad has to go and we are helping the opposition organize it. but ultimately syrians are going to have to determine their own future. >> i don't want to have our military involved in syria and our objectives are to replace assad and have in place a new government which is friendly to us and i want to make sure they get armed and they have arms necessary to defend themselves but also to remove assad. >> question. the candidates agreed assad must go. is seeing assad go the best outcome in syria? mort? >> yeah, without question. but he is not going to leave gently, going gently into the night. it is very easy to say we are going to leave it up to the syrian people but the syrian military and syrian forces after saddam have all the he weapons. it is a completely unbalance ad approach and therefore an ineffective way of policy of trying to get him out. we are going to have to find other ways to pressure assad and pressure his supporters not to support him. >> you know how complicated the population is in syria? >> oh, yeah. >> you have g
proceed no. >> ellen book tv the rise of bashar al assad in it syria, the face that many in the weight -- west said that he would implement reforms and the syrian ruler is the group turned toward repression and violence. this is just under an hour. >> tonight we have a program with david lashed. a professor of middle eastern studies and history at the senate study of a texas. and david has been going to syria i believe 23 years. >> 1989. twenty-three years ago. >> started three years. some experience in that country. the reason i am excited to have and talk to us tonight. david got to know bashar al assad having spent a lot of time talking to him, which is pretty unique for an american command academic a particular. david broder a book in 2005 which held out great hope for the future of syria. if you recall, there were is some sense that he would be a reformer in the syria after his father died. discovered that is not the case, and he has no written another book called the fall of the house of assad. so we're going to talk a bit about that tonight. my first question is going to be quit
on assad head for a bounty of $25 million. so all of these pillars are shaking faster and faster. i don't think it's going to go to next summer. >> the point you raised about the sectarian issue. i think this was one of the cards the regime was relying on and that's why they created sectarian based massacres especially in the western side in syria which is a vulnerable area where you actually have one village, one village. that is syria's existence over hundreds of thousands of years. what happened is the syrian regime tried to break these organic co-existing structures that really mark the region. and the amazing thing is the level of self-restraint the syrian people have shown. the syrian army had access to villages from other sects and they did not engage in sectarian violence. it has been limited. considering the level of brutality and the sectarian sentiments in the country they have shown tremendous unity. anybody would be touched to see the slogans the people raced after a four-day campaign where close to 900 people were massacred. the slogans they carried were that this revoluti
that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute posted the activists who are part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say it started being used by the opposition areas no longer under assad's control. this is just under two hours. >> good morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds
the assad regime, is anyone helping the rebels? the leaders of the syrian rebels have begun to express their frustration with what they see as the west's abandonment of the rebel cause. as come ab ab commander of the free syrian army told clarissa ward on "60 minutes"." >> i get angry when i see civilians killed on the street, and no one will in the world is helping the syrian people. the syrian people will never forgive the international community for failing to stop the assad regime. >> but when the weapons are sent to the syrian rebels, they don't always go where we would want them to. all too often it goes to those who wish to empose sharia law in syria. but as dr. mahernana with close ties to the u.s. government who is trying to arm the free syrian army. >> when you fight for your life, ask for help. when good people don't help you you go to ask for help for else. >> let's bring in president of ploughshares fund, a member of secretary of state hillary clinton international security advisory board and the council on foreign relations. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> are
in the assad regime. in part i think it was a horrible misreading of the nature of the assad regime and the possibility of negotiating a diplomatic transition to a new government. and i think in part it was due to an insistence on multilateralism almost doesn't end in itself which comes from u.s. policy which decision-making to the united nations which was the paralyzed by a threat to the russian and chinese veto. the obama administration entered office and initially soft-pedaled its criticism of the regimes hostile policies including including its violent crackdown on its own people its long-standing support for terrorism second only to iran, its implacable hostility to israel and its close alliance with iran and russia and the soviet union. syrian supported groups killing u.s. troops in iraq and supported hezbollah the lebanese terrorist organization which was responsible for the death of many americans in lebanon, including 1983 bombings of the u.s. embassy and the marine barracks in beirut and i go back to lebanon because i think it's worth noting that the marines initially had
's largest city, as block-by-block battles rage between president bashar al assad fighters and rebels. >> the dead and dying, the innocent, the breast-feeding babies, the children and the old folk -- all i desire is that the world shows a little empathy for us. that is all i want. >> to the east internet videos showed casualties in the after math of an air strike. human rights watch reported sunday the assad regime is using cluster bombs in civilian areas. they detonate above ground and scatter smaller bomblets. based on you-tube videos and eyewitness testimony the group said its analysts believe the bombs are older, russian munitions of soviet vintage. the syrian government denied it and russia's foreign minister argued there's no confirmation that the ordnance was supplied by russia. amid the massive human toll a cultural casualty, the mosque dating from the 12th century was partially destroyed over the weekend >> the syrian army defeated an armed terrorist group which was trying to occupy the mosque >> suarez: state tv said president assad ordered urgent repairs. rebels said the sy
three months ago after joining the anti-assad protests. he risked his life to take film footage, at first with his cell phone. >> i recorded videos on youtube, and it was very professional. we made, like, professional reports to reuters, so we needed a professional camera. >> you went from student to journalist? >> yes. now in syria, all people who were involved in the revolution -- all of them are citizen journalists. >> he shot this video in the first city taken by the rebels. >> i was responding. i was about 20 inches from the tank. >> in our studio, rudy uses -- explains the technical tricks he has used to protect video on his computer from the prying eyes of eckpnts. he has been to jail three times. he was also tortured and feared for his life. >> maybe i'm the next one who will die in the shelling. but because we try to just let everyone in the world see what the rajiv -- what the regime is doing. we are ready to sacrifice ourselves to the world. >> these are all students who became a citizen journalists before fleeing syria. in paris, they found support from like mines --
lebanon between groups that support and oppose the syrian government of bashar al assad. local media reported exchanges of fire involving automatic weapons and mortars. the violence was triggered by the killing of a top lebanese security official last week. he was known as a lead og poentd of the syrian president. his death was seen as an act of retaliation by the pro-assad faction in lebanon. the tensions are driving a wedge between the people, mainly sunni factions opposed to the syrian president are fighting against the shia group hezbollah and other sympathizers of bashar al assad. >>> a high-ranking syrian official says president assad welcomes in principle the cease-fire proposal by the united nations and the arab league. syria's deputy foreign minister faisal mekdad made the remarks on monday in an interview with nhk. president assad met with the united nations and envoy lakhdar brahimi sunday in damascus. brahimi called for a cease-fire between government and opposition forces starting on friday, the first day of aislamc eid al adha, a muslim holiday. deputy foreign minister
. >> it is up to the west and the rest of the world what we will do with assad. for the west not helping, that is creating extremists. >> this place has seen so much martyrdom, no one is sure how long talks of reconciliation can survive. the what they are sure of is more death. so sure, they now big graves in advance, the victims on known. -- and now david graves in advance, the victims unknown. >> the u.s. ambassador in damascus joins us. thank you. >> my pleasure. >> the last cease-fire never really existed. is there any reason to think this will be different? >> the trend in hund -- the trend in syria has been very negative. neither side believes the other will honor a cease-fire. i am pretty sure that both sides think the other will gain advantage from it. even if they agree to it from -- agree to it nominally, i have little confidence it will take hold, even four days. >> live with the syrian government agree to it? >> they might agree to it because their russian and chinese patrons have joined the un in calling for the cease- fire. they do not want to be blamed as the ones who refu
council, we know that russia has been supplying hardware for assad. we understand -- we think that the americans are supporting ticket. this is a security council who is doing nothing in this situation. why should anyone believe that the u.n. can fix things? >> you are right that the divisions in the council make a solution difficult. that was one of the reasons i resigned, as you know, but the challenge is to overcome those divisions and get them working -- i tried. at the beginning, they came together, but it was not sustained. if the security council is not made to come together, then we are in a really hopeless situation. >> and syria will descend further into war? >> it could get worse. it could get much worse. how do we solve the problem? militarization or intervention, in my judgment, will make the situation much worse. >> what do you foresee happening? >> i think the neighbors will be drawn in. already, we have seen thousands of refugees fleeing to jordan, lebanon, turkey, iraq. she hottest elements are coming in across the border -- jihadist elements are coming in acr
and not feel disingenuous, how russia helps assad as the u.s. fiddles. and we'll start with jim phillips. >> thanks, steve. i'd like to set the stage for our next three speakers who will focus primary listen on russian -- primarily on russian policy by outlining u.s. policy and how it's factored into the blood path we see in syria today with more than 30,000 dead and no end in sight. from the beginning, i think it's fair to say that the obama administration was behind the curve on following events in syria. in part i think it was because of ideological baggage it carried when it entered office which led to wishful thinking about the supposed benefits of engaging the assad regime. in part i think it was a horrible misreading of the nature of the assad regime and the possibility of negotiating a diplomatic transition to a new government. and i think in part it was due to an insistence on multilateralism almost as an end in itself which hamstrung u.s. policy and pushed decision making to the united nations which was paralyzed by a lack of consensus and the threat of a russian and chinese ve
in the middle east and a message to president assad to as turkey authorizes military action inside syria. >> this is not a mandate to wage war. it is so we can't prepare new development and protect our interests there. we are not declaring war on syria. >> mitt romney relaunched -- why the republicans are claiming victory at last night's u.s. presidential debate. >> coat ♪ >> love them, we do. 50 years ago today, the beatles released their first ever single. we look at how it holds up. decker packwood cause >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america to the problem. the turkish prime minister said today he had no intention of starting a war with syria. but the message is mixed and the tensions are high. the turkish parliament authorize military action against neighbor after syrian shells landed in the turkish town killing five civilians. >> lot this was not turkey's war, but the deaths of one family next to the syrian border have changed kuwait this country sees its neighbors conflicts. the government has called the strike from syria a final straw. left of the isn't family hoped. -- th
has questions. inside the stronghold of the bashar al-assad, the bbc gains rare access to one legion of syria still trying to ignore the conflict -- one region of syria still trying to ignore the conflict. in las vegas, the housing crisis has left people wishing they had not taken the gamble. >> i was left over extended. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. it has now been four weeks since the attack on the libyan consulate in benghazi, which left the u.s. ambassador and three others dead. today, american rule makers were demanding answers about whether the levels of security were enough. testifying before a congressional committee, state department official said the correct number of agents were in place. during this election season, this issue has become controversial. our north america editor reports. in the american ambassador to libya, chris stevens, and three of his colleagues -- >> the american ambassador to libya, chris stevens, and three of his colleagues died in the attack. they had repeatedly asked for tighter security. initi
. the u.n. arab league envoy to syria met with bashar al-assad. assad put several conditions on a cease-fire. >> this peacekeeping is a partnership, global partnership between the security council, member states and secretariat. collective low we have to continue focussing on the meeting the demands of needs. >> he said it is still too early to tell how many peacekeepers might be deployed. the u.n. sent about 400 unarmed observers and monitors to syria in april. they were forced to leave in august due to safety concerns. >>> fighting has spilled into lebon. roll iters ne -- lebanon. reuters reports seven people were killed. those who back the opposition, ran into lebanese government troupes in beirut. in the northern scity of tripol. the assassination last week of a syrian officer was triggered the fighting. pro assad forces in lebanon are believed to have killed him as an act of retaliation. hezbollah and groups support assad. most suni muslims want him to step down. >>> tow makers around the globe are presenting their cars. brazil has the the world's fourth largest auto market. u.s. g
and military gear to aid the assad regime, in the syrian civil war. >> this was equipment and ammunition that was being sent from a russian agency to the syrian defense ministry. this equipment is now being examined by relevant units. under no circumstances, can this and something like this happening on a passenger plane is a violation of international flights. >> warner: russian authorities had disputed earlier reports that military equipment was on board the plane. and moscow accused the turks of endangering the roughly 30 crew and passengers, many of them russian. the plane was allowed to fly on to damascus without the disputed cargo. but the syrian transport minister condemned turkey's actions. >> ( translated ): what happened could be described as turkish aero-piracy against a civilian syrian plane. they took with force a part of the shipment without giving any receipts. it's a kind of provocation that reflects a turkish political failure in its dealing with the syrian issue. >> warner: the turks have voiced repeated frustration that russia-- a major arms supplier to syria-- has blo
continuing assad to murder his own people. this is a region of tumult and iran on the path to a nuclear weapon. >> but let's give the president a chance. >> governor, i'm glad that you recognize that al-qaeda's a threat. you said russia. not al-qaeda. you said rush. the 1980's are calling to ask for their foreign policy back because the cold war has been over for 20 years. governor, when it comes to our foreign policy, you seem to want to import the foreign poll soifs the 1980's just like the social poll soifs the 1950's and the economic policies of the 1920's. you say that you're not interested in duplicating what happened in iraq. but just a few weeks ago you said you think we should have more troops in iraq right now. and the challenge we have -- i know you haven't been in a position to actually execute foreign policy. but every time you've offered an opinion you've been wrong. you said we should have gone into iraq despite the fact that there were no weapons of mass destruction. you said that we should still have troops in iraq to this day. you indicated that we shouldn't be passing
east history, trinity university author of the fall of the house of assad's arab-israeli conflict and more. the title of the first talk with of mona yacoubian is shifting the paradigm in syria, a role for u.s. leadership. mona yacoubian in. >> thank you for the national counsel and arab relations if the invitation. i would told i had ten minutes. what i'm going to do is unpack syria in five minutes and then do some u.s. policy recommendations in another five minutes. >> do you mind coming? >> i'm sorry. >> sorry, i didn't say anything. >> sorry. >> apologies, trying to save time. okay. as i said i'd like to start by talking about conflict in sir yab where it is today, and then talk about u.s. policy options. in terms of where the conflict in syria is today, it is now 19 months in to by far the bloodiest of the arabic risings. there has been more than 30,000 people killed, about 350 found in rough refugees in countries surrounding syria, one and a half million syrians internally displaced inside the country 28,000 syrians are reported having being demeanor -- disappeared. this is c
artillery fighting between turkey and syria. yesterday syrian activists predict that the assad regime will fall. this was held by the u.s. institute of peace, and it is close to two hours. >> good morning. in jim marshall, the new president of the institute of peace, which i am delighted to tell you, and i am pleased everyone is here for an import -- to hear about and the port project that has been sponsored by the institute for peace. my job is to introduce steve heideman. he has directed the center for democracy and civil studies -- civil society at georgetown. he -- he is a terrific asset for the institute. this project is driven by syrians, with technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and a sister institute in germany. it is important these efforts are driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states did not work all that well. we are pleased that you are here. i hope you have lots of questions, and if i can turn this over to you -- >> thank you para much, and let me add my welcome to you. we are delighted to see you her
the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they called this uprising from the very beginning. they depicted it as driven by foreign elements, as a conspiracy against the syrian people, against the syrian nation, and it's a way of denying any legitimacy to the claims of the opposition and rejecting the possibility that the regime itself might have some culpability for t
is deeply hostile to president assad and says that syria must be held to account. they are urging nato allies to help. >> the a very very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> this is exactly what many people feared, the conflict spreading and flaming an already divided region. turkey backed the rebels, lightly armed, but without clear that ship. they have taken ground from a substantial army backed by iran in particular. president assad no longer controls his country, but equally he has not lost it. the longer the syrian deadlock, the greater the risk to its neighbors and the region will get sucked into confrontation. >> you will see this proxy conflict boiling over. you need some kind of international momentum to form a consensus that action can shift the ground away from conflict. >> note and to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television is that this does result of unbearable bombings and a lot of today. -- no end to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television said that this is the resul
banned under assad. until recently, most of the people did not have not syrian leadership. the most influential figure is -- the leader jailed in turkey and considered a terrorist by the west. they have a founded these courts in his name. people's courts where they handed down a verdict. on this particular morning, a group of farmers complain about a diesel shortage. the farmers are angry. they say, they cannot use their machinery without fuel. >> we do not have a loss here. we are the government here. if we do not have the so, what can i do? the farmers leave empty-handed. the harvesting equipment stands idle. the kurdish part of syria has virtually no industry apart from oil this year, the produce looks set to rot due to the lack of fuel. the price is skyrocketing. supplies have practically dried up. >> we just have to reach a less. otherwise, we will run out of money. >> this flag, belonging to the sister organization is a problem for turkey. some are concerned they could try to set up a state here. in turkey's eyes, a terrorist state. there have already created the infrastructur
killed by a huge car bomb in beirut. the leading opponent is bashar al-assad. syria's leader is being accused of being behind the bombing. >> they rushed to eastern beirut. this was as the weekend was about to begin. the bomb went off in a crowded mainly christian district of the city. local tv stations were broadcasting images of burned out cars and images of wounded people. 8 people were killed and as many as 100 were injured. the main target was a brigadier general, the chief security official in lebanon. he had recently implicated syria and its lebanese allies, hezbollah, for the killing of the prime minister. he was a fierce critic of syria. this will create shockwaves in the entire region. after a long time of relative calm, this is the first big attack in four years. many feared something like this to happen sooner or later and that lebanon would be dragged into the conflict some political leaders have accused the assad regime in syria of being behind the attack. >> for more on the incident from of volatility out of the region, i spoke a brief time ago with a senior fellow at t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 778 (some duplicates have been removed)